Bare Cove Park (Hingham, MA)

Date Of Visit: March 30, 2019

Location: Bare Cove Drive, Hingham, MA

Cost: Free

Hours: Daily, sunrise to sunset

Parking: There are 2 parking lots.  The larger parking lot located at Bare Cove Drive has room for about 100 cars.  There is also a smaller parking lot off Beal St

Trail Size/Difficulty: 484 acres, easy

Handicapped Accessible: Yes, there are paved trails but the side trails may not be accessible to all

Dog Friendly: Yes (see website for rules for taking dogs to the park)

Highlights: wildlife, birds, nature, lake, easy trails, cycling, running, scenic, museum

Website: Bare Cove Park

Map of Park: Bare Cove Park Map

IMG_5580

Once the site of a ammunition depot, Bare Cove Park is now a 484 acre park full of wildlife, scenic views and trails for running, cycling or just walking.

There is a variety of birds and other wildlife at the park.  Foxes, coyotes and even deer have been reportedly seen at the park.  So, do keep this in mind if you do bring your dog.  I didn’t see any aforementioned animals at the park.  But, I did see a diverse group of birds there.

Granted, I did have to go off the beaten paths to view some of these birds, particularly the hawks and kestrel.  But, you should see lots of cardinals, blue jays, sparrows and other smaller birds in your travels, even on the main trails.

The main trails are paved and wise in most parts.  So there is lots of room for cyclists, runners and people walking with their dogs.

IMG_5731

One of the many great things about Bare Cove is that it is beautiful all year.  You might think that it wouldn’t be very pretty during the early spring time.  You’d be wrong!  But, seriously, the natural colors and the trees are majestic.  Even the multi colored ones. Alt If you are looking to see plants and flowers and other colorful views I do recommend visiting in the mid to late spring, summer or, of course, fall.

One of the hidden historical aspects of the park is its military past.  The area was used to produce and distribute munitions and other military devices. Until 1971, military goods were produced here.

In an effort to commemorate the service of the people who worked at these depots, there is a small museum with exhibits, photos, military tools and other gadgets that were made at the depot.

IMG_5774

IMG_4931

There is also a viewing area to watch videos and DVDs about the history of the depot and how Weymouth and Hingham, MA contributed to the war effort.

There are two monuments outside of the museum.

One of the monuments is dedicated to all of the workers who helped the war efforts.

IMG_5772

The next memorial is dedicated to the workers who lost their lives when a ship they were unloading, the USS FY 415, exploded and sank on May 11, 1944, when signal rockets caught fire.

IMG_5839

Another interesting part of the area near the museum is that the posts which the bots tied onto when they originally unloaded their munitions at the depot are located in front of the museum.

There is also a fire museum nearby.  During my visit, a fire truck from the museum was on display at the park.

IMG_5508

But, the hidden history doesn’t end there.  A sign posted on Bare Cove Path indicates that an Almshouse (called “Town Farm”) used to be there.

IMG_5798

In short, almshouses were a place for the indigent or those who could not care for themselves.  To find out more about Almshouse, you can refer to my previous blog post about Almshouses.

With its winding trails and access to water, Bare Cove Park is a great place to take your dog.

IMG_5779

Kevin, a 2 year old Boston Terrier, posed for me during his walk around the park.

IMG_5871

Cooper, a 9 year old Golden Retriever, played fetch in the water during his visit.

 

North River Wildlife Sanctuary (Marshfield, MA)

Dates Of Visits: March 16 & 17, 2019

Location: 200 Main St., Marshfield, MA

Hours: Open daily dawn til dusk (office is open Mon-Fri, 9:00-4:00)

Cost: Free for members, Nonmembers: $4 Adults, $3 Seniors (65+), $3 Children (2-12)

Parking: There is free parking for about 30 to 40 cars

Trail Size/Difficulty: 225 acres, 5 miles of trails (universally accessible: 0.5-mile loop)/ Easy.  See website for additional information.

Handicapped Accessible: The Fern Sensory Trail is universally accessible.  But the other trails are not handicapped accessible.

Dog Friendly: No, MASS Audubon trails are not dog friendly

Website: North River Wildlife Sanctuary

Map: North River Wildlife Sanctuary Trail Map

Highlights: wildlife, wide variety of birds, observation deck, sensory trail

Summary: Easy trails, a variety of wildlife and birds (with one special bird), boardwalks and an observation deck are just some of the features of this park

IMG_4943

It’s not everyday that you see an eagle.  At least not in the suburbs of Massachusetts.  But, that’s exactly what happened during a visit to one of the hidden New England treasures in Marshfield, MA.

In trurgh, Marshfield is home to a lot of different wildlife.  You may find beavers in some of the rivers and ponds.  There are coyotes, wolves and deer in the area.  But, eagles are a different matter.

While I was walking along the River Loop Trail, a .5 miles trail that loops around the field across Summer St, I noticed a very large bird soaring above the treetops.  I froze at first, not believing what I had seen.  A Bald Eagle, not a common bird in these parts, was indeed flying above me. It’s unusual to see birds like this in Marshfield.  Later during my visit, one of the workers at the Audubon informed me that an eagle had a nest in that area.

There are a variety of other birds at the sanctuary such as cardinals, blue jays, red winged blackbirds and chickadees.

I have to make a confession though.  I sort of cheated.  There are bird feeders located in front of the office which made it easier to photograph some of these birds.  But, I was able to photograph a lot of the birds on the trails.

IMG_5374

The trails are fairly easy to negotiate.  In fact, the only issue I had walking on them had more to do with the time of the year I visited.  The temperatures had risen melting much of the snow which created mud puddles, then froze over making it it a little icy.  But, this should not be an issue now.

The first trail at the sanctuary is the Sensory Trail.  There are educational exhibits along the trail such as a display that shows examples of needles and bark.  Visitors can touch the display and see the difference between the two materials.  There is an exhibit that shows the lifecycle of a butterfly along the trail.  The sanctuary also has solar panels which they use for energy.  There are boardwalks along the trail as the area is rather marshy.  Unfortunately, I could not access all of the trails on the Sensory Trail due to the flooded and muddy nature of the trail.

There is one tricky part to accessing the other trails at North River Wildlife Sanctuary.  To access the observation deck and the other trails that lead up to it, you must first cross Summer St (see attached link to the ap of the sanctuary for more details).  It can be a busy road depending on when you visit.  Do use caution while crossing the street.

Once you cross Summer Street, you will see a field with a nesting area, which I don’t usually see birds using, and a trail that loops around the area.  You can also view the aptly named North River from the top of the area.

If you’re lucky, you may see a few chipmunks and red squirrels along the Red Maple Loop which is accessible off the main trail (the River Loop trail).

The most popular attraction (besides the eagles) is the observation deck off the again aptly named North River View trail.  The observation deck offers pretty views of the North River and the surrounding Marshfield neighborhood.

As I was leaving the sanctuary I did see one hopeful sign.  Spring is indeed springing!

IMG_5358

Similar Places I Have Visited:

Daniel Webster Wildlife Sanctuary (Marshfield, MA)

Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary (Topsfield, MA)

The Point (Salem, MA)

Date Of Visit: February 2, 2019

Location: The Point, Salem, MA

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking is available in the area and the closest parking garage is at 10 Congress St

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Summary: Rich in history and art, The Point neighborhood is one of the less noticed areas of Salem, MA.

IMG_3855

Salem isn’t just about witches and ghost tours.

Cackling witches, costumed partiers and other tourists flock to the downtown historical Salem area every Halloween.  But, they often drive or walk past one of the more interesting parts of Salem.

The interesting thing about The Point, besides its history and the street art that is scattered throughout the neighborhood, is that is a mere half a mile (give or take) south of the bustling Essex Street and other commercial areas of Salem.

Located off Congress St, The Point encompasses mostly Peabody and Ward Streets.  It is a short walk or drive from the intersection of Congress and Hawthorne streets.  One landmark to look for is Shetland Industrial Park.  You can easily spot the area of Congress St by the murals that are visible from the street.

But, The Point area wasn’t always known for street art.  Once the main area for fish drying along the peninsula, The Point was the center for Salem’s early maritime business and played a critical role in the economic development of the area.  These wooden fish drying “stages” gave the area its original name of Stage Point. Once the peninsula was filled in, the mostly French-Canadian mill workers adopted the name “La Pointe” for the area.

The Point would later become a hub for leather and shoe workshops in the early 19th century, The Point utilized its proximity to the harbor to take in imports such as coal and cotton.  One of the chief companies in this trade was a company founded by several Salem merchants called the Naumkeag Steam Cotton Company (there’s that name again – see previous Facebook post if you’re scratching your head right now).

As the area attracted more and more immigrant workers to the growing industries, boarding houses and company owned tenements (with modest rents I’m sure) were built to accommodate the growing population.

Sadly, the area would be destroyed by the “Great Fire of 1914” which destroyed 1,376 buildings and made over 18,000 people homeless or jobless.  Naumkeag Steam Cotton Company remained there, though.  At least until a wildcat strike in 1933 which highlighted the tensions between management and the workers.

Eventually, the Naumkeag business began to move their production to South Carolina in the 1940s and the company closed in 1953.  I’ve always found it interesting how the demographics of the various areas in New England (and the country) shift with the changing business landscapes.  As the Naumkeag company began to close mills, the French-Canadian people began to migrate.  In their place, new immigrants, chiefly from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.  This diverse community exists largely in the area.  The name of the area changed yet again to “El Punto.”

Murals and street art are spread throughout the “El Punto” area.  One of the first works of art you may notice is this mural on the side of a business.

IMG_3957

From the Congress St entrance to The Point, there are two streets.  Most of the art is on these two streets.  On Peabody Street there is a series of works of art along a fence created by artists in the area.  Unfortunately, the shadows were a little tough to work around and I was working on a tight schedule so I wouldn’t wait for better light.  This is a prime example of why mid day light is one of the worst times to photograph, although it is a common time for people to go out and photograph because you can’t always shoot during the blue or golden hours.  So, you work around the elements.  Luckily, I did have some cloud cover for some of the shoot which helped.  Also, the streets are very busy with traffic, so do take care if you go and parking is tight on this street.  I love how many of the murals look like art you might see in a museum or in a book.

I had to take some of the photos from unusual angles due to the parked cars on the streets and because of the areas where some of the murals were located.  For instance, this work of art of a woman with a chicken was located at the corner of a building which didn’t have a wide enough walkway to photograph from.  There were actually many murals on the buildings on Peabody and Ward streets.

IMG_3872-2

There were several spots on the buildings like this.

These murals on the apartment buildings in the aea and businesses were easier to photograph from the street.  I especially like the art that has a three dimensional feel to them.

The murals are not just on Peabody and Ward streets though.  In fact, you have to hunt for a few of the street art (some of which may technically not be in The Point area).

These works of art were located in an alleyway off Lafayette St.  There were lights strung up between the buildings in this alley.  I can only imagine they look even prettier, and are more fun to photograph, during the evening hours.  Mental note, come back for some evening photography another time.

And this lone mural was located on an unnamed (or at least there wasn’t a sign for the street) adjacent to Ward St.  Sometimes I wonder how annoying it must be for people who live in these buildings or in the area to have people stop by to take photographs.  But, I will also mention how on my many excursions to this area I have never been bothered.  People are both friendly and, I assume, used to seeing people in their neighborhood taking photos.  Naturally, I do try to be respectful and not spend too much time taking shots.  Despite the good nature of the people there I can’t help but feel like an intruder of sorts.

IMG_3970

The Point is not just a place for art, though.  There is also a park at The Point, logically called Peabody Street Park (15 Peabody Street).  The park has trees, benches, a jungle gym and some pretty views from the Salem Harbor Walk.

There are also ceramic works of art from that appear to have been made by children that line the walls in the park.

Birdhouses are placed in some of the trees at the park.

IMG_3908

There is also a mural from the downtown Salem area across the river which is visible from the Salem Harbor Walk.

IMG_3899

This mural is on a business located on Derby St not far from the Point.  It shows just how close the busy tourist area is to the largely unnoticed Point area.

With its beautiful works of art, pretty views and charm, The Point is definitely one of New England’s hidden gems.

Similar Places I Have Visited:

Cat Alley (Manchester, NH)

Please check out my Hidden New England Facebook page and like my page to see posts about Hidden New England which are not included in this blog.

 

Winter Island (Salem, MA)

IMG_4008

Date Of Visit: February 2, 2019

Location: 50 Winter Island Rd, Salem, MA

Hours: Open daily sunrise to sunset

Cost: Free

Parking: There is a parking area for about 20 to 30 cars at the park as well as street parking for about 2 dozen cars on Derby St before you arrive at Winter Island Rd

Handicapped Accessible: Yes.  However, some trails may be too steep

Dog Friendly: Yes

Size: 45 acres

Highlights: lighthouse, scenic views, military historical attraction, beach, easy trails, boat storage and launch areas, camping sites

Summary: Once the site of a fish drying and ship building location by the early settlers, Winter Island is now a haven for beach goers and boating enthusiasts.  Winter Island has easy trails with scenic views.  The most popular highlight of the park is Pickering Light which is located along the rocky shore.

IMG_3995-2

Ask anyone about Salem, MA, and you’re sure to hear about the House Of The Seven Gables, the Salem Witch Museum or one of the other historical museums, homes and shops that dot the city.  But, the best part of Salem may be miles (or more precisely a mile and a half) away from the historic downtown area.

Winter Island has a rich history as a shipbuilding area (a facility is still located there for this purpose) and as a defensive point for colonial and American forces during Queen Anne’s War and the American Revolutionary War.  It would continue to act in this capacity throughout the 19th century.  The area is also used to dry dock boats in the off season.  The area is used for people to camp in the RVs in the warmer seasons.  So the land is used year round.

IMG_4263

The lighthouse at Winter Island, Fort Pickering Light (aka Winter Island Light), was built to warn and protect sailors from the rocky coast.  Built in 1871, Pickering Light stands 28 feet above sea level,  It is built of iron lined with brick.  There used to be a bridge that connected the lighthouse to land.  I wish they had that there now!  Instead I had to walk down some rocks to get some photos up close.  The rocks can be slippery, especially this time of the year as it can be icy on the colder days.

There are also some military fortifications on display at the park.

From left to top left to bottom, Winter Island is a bunker installation and some markers in memory of those who were lost during war or other conflicts.

There is also a short trail that loops around park and offers some pretty views of the harbor.  Like most places, the best times to visit are during sunrise or sunset (or just before each time of day).  But, it is especially true here.  The orange, gold and blues help to accentuate the beauty of the park.  I spent quite a while at the park to ensure I could capture a few shots just before sunrise.  You gotta love those “golden hours.”

Don’t let the warm colors of the sunset fool you.  What looks like chunks of ice in these photos is actually ice on top of the lobster traps in the water.

IMG_4114

There are lots of ducks, seagulls and other birds at Winter Island.

There also seems to be a lot of reconstruction at the park.  This building looked like it was being gutted and perhaps renovated for future use.

A hidden gen within this hidden gem is Waikiki Beach.  The first sign you’ll see after you arrive at the entrance to the park is probably going to be the sign to Waikiki Beach.  While it may not compare to the beach in Hawaii that shares its name, it is a second close.

In the colder seasons you may find people skating or practicing hockey on the pond.

IMG_4055

The beach is usually packed with sun seekers and beach lovers during the warmer months, it is also a popular place for people to go and play with your dogs during the winter months.

IMG_4012

Rigby is a 5 year old mixed breed dog. His mom told me he had fun playing with Oliver at Waikiki Beach.  I have photographed Oliver in the past.  As his Instagram profile states he is a “good boy.”  You can find him here on Instagram or at oliverbestdog.

IMG_4031

Similar places I have visited:
(Hidden) Things to do in the area:

 

Hidden History – Whip City (Westfield, MA)

img_3214-2

Date Of Visits: January 25, 2019

Locations: Westfield, MA

Summary: The first and once leading manufacturer of whips in the United States, Westfield, MA, still retains the title of “whip city.”

As a new feature to my blog I am featuring a monthly historical account of one New England city, town or area.  But, my goal is to not focus on the obvious or well known historical aspects of certain areas.  Nor do I necessarily want to focus on the historically famous cities and towns in New England.  Rather, I am going to bring lesser known historical accounts of certain areas in New England.  Every area in New England has a hidden history and I hope these posts help to bring some light to these hidden pasts.

Whip City Music, Whip City Brew, Whip City Candle Company.  Why do so many places and shops in Westfield, MA have “whip city” in their name?

The short is because it is “whip city.”

Back in the horse and buggy days of the early 1900s (shortly before my birth), Westfield, MA, was the leading center of the buggy whip industry.  However, as automobiles became more affordable and accessible, the whip industry declined and many of the whip businesses closed shop.  Interestingly, the first car that was built in the United States (it was really a horse drawn buggy with a 4 HP, single cylinder gasoline engine) made its first run on public roads on September 21, 1893 in neighboring Springfield, MA.

The “whip city” brand still lives on.  Dozens of businesses from a siding and window installing company to a travel agency share the “whip city” name.  And the whip industry isn’t exactly dead.  Not yet at least.

People can still have whips made for whatever your purpose at Westfield Whip. The last remaining whip company in Westfield, MA, Westfield Whip was established in 1884.  Located at 360 Elm St, it is very easy to drive by the building and not notice its historical importance.  It may seem like any other old building in a city of old buildings.  But, it has a long history of industry and commerce in the city.  In fact it is such an important piece of history that it was placed on the National List of Historic Places on October 17, 1985.  The Westfield River runs along the side of the whip manufacturing building.  It was shuttered when I went to visit it Friday and it is only open by appointment only.

In 1872, Henry Martin Van Duesen formed his first partnership in Southfield and moved his business to Westfield in 1880 making it the first whip manufacturer in what would later be designated “whip city.”  Van Duesen began his career in the whip industry as a whip braider at the age of 11.  The building which once stood as the first whip building manufacturer was changed by Duesen to a factory to the production of lawn swings in 1925.  Stanley Hardware bought the factory in 1936 .  Now, it functions as an apartment building located at 42 Arnold St.  But it still retained the name of Van Duesen.

I did gain access to the front desk area and the friendly office worker allowed me to take a photo of the inside of the office area.  Just looking at the brick interior and the structure of the room you can see how it once certainly could have been used to manufacture goods.

img_3173

Fort Revere (Hull, MA)

Date Of Visit: January 12, 2019

Location: Fort Revere, Telegraph Hill, 60 Farina Rd, Hull, MA

Hours: Open daily from dawn until dusk

Cost: Free

Parking: There is room for about 10-15 cars in the parking lot

Handicapped Accessible: The fort is not handicapped accessible but there are views that can be enjoyed from the hill at the parking lot

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: scenic, historical, picnic areas, barbecue grills

Summary: The former site of American fortification during the American Revolution, Fort Revere has also scenic views and picnic areas.

Websites: Fort Revere

Mass.gov Fort Revere Website

img_2994-2

As most people about Hull, Mass, and they will undoubtedly reference Nantasket Beach, the old Paragon Park and maybe even the Red Parrot.

But, the most beautiful part of Hull may be hidden up an otherwise unremarkable side road. In fact, you may easily drive by Farina Rd if you are not already aware of the beauty that sits atop the road.

For Revere offers some of the most beautiful views this side of Boston.

The views of Boston Harbor from Fort Revere are nothing less than breath taking. Boston Light is visible in the foreground and Graves Light stands behind it in the distance.

Once used as a American military installation during the American Revolution and later used as the site of a storehouse, Fort Revere is a truly hidden historical treasure. Although it is a shame it is used more for graffiti and other unproductive activities.

The steps at the fort are in disrepair. So be careful if you do visit.

On July 14, 1976 (Bastille Day) Fort Revere dedicated a memorial that commemorates the French forces who served and died at the fort in the American Revolution.

The memorials are written in English and French.

The graves from some of the people who served there still remain below the fort. You may notice rocks left on some of the tombstones.

img_2947

The bridge on to Spinnaker Hill Lane leads to Hog Island and there are pretty views of the coast of Hull.

There is also a tower that is no longer in use at Fort Revere.

img_2985-2

Fort Revere is a dog friendly attraction. These two Cocopoos (a Cocker Spaniel and Poodle mixed breed) named Sajac, the brown 10 year old dog in front, and Deacon, the white 1 year old dog in back, enjoyed walking around the fort.

img_2976-3

Cat Alley (Manchester, NH)

img_2553-2

Date Of Visit: January 12, 2019

Location: Dean Ave (off Elm St), Manchester, NH (about 20 minutes south of Concord, NH and 1 hour northwest of Boston MA)

Hours: Accessible 24 hours a day

Cost: Free

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Parking: There is plentiful parking on Elm St.  Just don’t forget to feed the meter.

Summary: Images of cats painted on the walls of an alley in Manchester, NH.

Highlights: graffiti, family friendly, historical

Tips:

  • cat alley is located on Dean Avenue between The Bookery, (844 Elm St) and Lala’s Hungarian Pastry (836 Elm St)
  • parking meter timers are enforced strictly
  • The street sign for Dean Avenue can be found on the shingle of LaLa’s Pastry Shop

img_2595

New Hampshire is known for being a dog friendly state.  It turns out it’s also cat friendly.

 

The artists involved in this artistic display include Peg Lipin, Bill Earnshaw, Brian Lapree, Noonan, Cindy O’Rourke, Del Christensen, Aimee Cozza, 11-year-old Kaitlin Gould, Brianna Gould, Caroline Chavette, Emily Drouin, Alex Mathieu and Anita Huddlestun.

Painted in 2009, Cat Alley has an assortment of cats in different poses and situations and professions.  Paintings of cat burglars, copy cat editors and cat barbers line the walls of the alley.  I never knew cats were such barbers.  Whenever I go anywhere near my cat with a of scissors, she freaks out.  They’re also pretty good in the kitchen too.  Maybe they should open a deli-cat-essen.

 

 

The alley is a little hard to find.  But, if you set your GPS to 844 or 836 Elm St you will be able to see it.  Unless you get there early, you may have to park some distance from the alley.  But, once you see the sign for Dean Avenue that can be found on the shingle of LaLa’s Pastry Shop you will know you’re there.

 

A plaque at the end of the alley gives a historical background about the alley.

img_2586

If you want to ride your bicycle to Cat Alley, you’ll be pleased to find these cat shaped structures to lock your bicycle.

 

Someone took an interest in my photography.  So, of course, I photographed him as well.  He did approach me and when he noticed what I was photographing we both went on our separate ways amicably.  Just something you may want to keep in mind if you do go for a visit.

img_2592

Below are a  few similar places I have visited and blogged about on my New England Nomad blog.  Please check them out and follow me at https://www.facebook.com/newenglandnomad/

Legal Graffiti Wall (Beverly, MA)

Murals (The Point, Salem, MA)

Nearby Attractions:

The Amoskeag Fishways

Currier Museum Of Art